Skip navigation

The identification of the domestic waste collection system associated with the least operative musculoskeletal disorders using human resource absence data

The identification of the domestic waste collection system associated with the least operative musculoskeletal disorders using human resource absence data

Thomas, David, Mulville, Mark and Hare, Billy (2019) The identification of the domestic waste collection system associated with the least operative musculoskeletal disorders using human resource absence data. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 150:104424. ISSN 0921-3449 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resconrec.2019.104424)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Author's Accepted Manuscript)
24887 THOMAS_Identification_Of_Domestic_Waste_Collection_System_Musculoskeletal_Disorders_(AAM)_2019.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (751kB) | Preview

Abstract

With increasing pressures around public sector costs, UK Local Authorities (LAs) and waste collection companies, are under pressure to reduce absence rates due to ill health. The identification of the ‘safest’ method of waste collection in the UK has been largely unresolved with many different types of waste and recycling receptacles used and deemed acceptable. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationships between domestic waste collection methods and absence due to Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) through the comparison of absence rates for different activity. Studies based upon ergonomic theory had suggested the use of wheeled bins is better than the use of boxes, but this has not been tested empirically. Absence data was obtained from 15 LAs who allocated a more detailed activity role to their records, allowing for activity absence rates to be calculated. The outputs were collated and analysed using SPSS to identify statistically significant relationships between types of waste collection services. The results confirm that wheeled bins are associated with less proxy measures of MSD than boxes, baskets and sacks with even lower absence rates associated with 1100 litre capacity bins, when handled by two workers. Findings also indicates that there is a level where MSD absence interventions are unlikely to be sustainable.

In conclusion these findings should help LAs better understand some critical factors regarding waste collection strategies and MSD absence and inform HSE enforcement strategies. Employers should interrogate their own ill health data and seek to move to systems that create less MSDs.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Epidemiology; Musculoskeletal disorder (MSD); Recycling and waste collection; Ill health; Absence
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences
Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences > Department of Built Environment
Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences > Sustainable Built Environment Research Group (SBERG)
Last Modified: 29 Jul 2020 01:38
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/24887

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics