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Causal inferences of external–contextual domains on complex construction, safety, health and environment regulation

Causal inferences of external–contextual domains on complex construction, safety, health and environment regulation

Umeokafor, Nnedinma ORCID: 0000-0002-4010-5806, Windapo, Abimbola and Evangelinos, Konstantinos (2019) Causal inferences of external–contextual domains on complex construction, safety, health and environment regulation. Safety Science, 118. pp. 379-388. ISSN 0925-7535 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssci.2019.05.033)

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Abstract

A robust and pragmatic regulatory framework that is based on a good understanding of the external–context domains of countries is fundamental for Safety, Health and Environment (SHE). However, in many developing and emerging economies the regulatory framework for SHE is complex and the external–context domains are poorly understood and not factored in SHE. Using Nigeria as a case, the study examines the causal inferences of the social, cultural, political, religious and institutional contexts on the complex Construction Safety, Health and Environment (CSHE) regulatory framework using a qualitative research approach. The findings show that the external-context domain factors are indirect determinants of CSHE regulation. There is evidence that the main external-context factors include the dysfunctional and fragmented health and safety (H&S) regulatory environments, which is exacerbated by the poor governmental and political attention on H&S. While political influence results in the low threat of regulation, ‘Nigerian factors’ such as ‘the no follow-up culture’ result in inadequate governmental and political involvement, among many, poor regulation and inadequate H&S laws. Although the need for a consolidated CSHE regulatory framework is emphasised hence recommended, it should be resilient to social and political pressure.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Construction safety, cultural context, social context, political context, well-being
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities
Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > Department of Built Environment
Last Modified: 15 Jul 2019 11:33
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/24770

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