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The present and the future of the contact hypothesis, and the need for integrating research fields

The present and the future of the contact hypothesis, and the need for integrating research fields

Vezzali, Loris and Stathi, Sofia ORCID: 0000-0002-1218-5239 (2016) The present and the future of the contact hypothesis, and the need for integrating research fields. In: Vezzali, Loris and Stathi, Sofia ORCID: 0000-0002-1218-5239, (eds.) Intergroup Contact Theory: Recent developments and future directions. Routledge, London, UK. ISBN 978-1315646510

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Abstract

There is no doubt that the contact hypothesis, proposed by Allport in his classic book The Nature of Prejudice (1954), has been remarkably influential in social psychology. The basic premise of the contact hypothesis is that contact between individuals who belong to different groups can foster the development of more positive out-group attitudes. Why is the issue of intergroup contact so popular in social psychology research? A possible answer is that prejudice and conflict remain intractable characteristics of the societies in which we live, despite attempts of politicians and policymakers to successfully implement social change. As such, contact and its effectiveness at improving out-group attitudes has been an appealing and enduring research topic for social scientists.

Item Type: Book Section
Uncontrolled Keywords: behavioral sciences, social sciences
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2019 08:51
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/24197

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