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Less is more: restricted application of insecticide to cattle to improve the cost and efficacy of tsetse control

Less is more: restricted application of insecticide to cattle to improve the cost and efficacy of tsetse control

Torr, S.J., Maudlin, I. and Vale, G.A. (2007) Less is more: restricted application of insecticide to cattle to improve the cost and efficacy of tsetse control. Medical and Veterinary Entomology, 21 (1). pp. 53-64. ISSN 0269-283X (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2915.2006.00657.x)

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Abstract

Studies were carried out in Zimbabwe of the responses of tsetse to cattle treated with deltamethrin applied to the parts of the body where most tsetse were shown to land. Large proportions of Glossina pallidipes Austen (Diptera: Glossinidae) landed on the belly (∼ 25%) and legs (∼ 70%), particularly the front legs (∼ 50%). Substantial proportions of Glossina morsitans morsitans Westwood landed on the legs (∼ 50%) and belly (25%), with the remainder landing on the torso, particularly the flanks (∼ 15%). Studies were made of the knockdown rate of wild, female G. pallidipes exposed to cattle treated with a 1% pour-on or 0.005% suspension concentrate of deltamethrin applied to the (a) whole body, (b) belly and legs, (c) legs, (d) front legs, (e) middle and lower front legs, or (f) lower front legs. The restricted treatments used 20%, 10%, 5%, 2% or 1% of the active ingredient applied in the whole-body treatments. There was a marked seasonal effect on the performance of all treatments. With the whole-body treatment, the persistence period (knockdown > 50%) ranged from ∼ 10 days during the hot, wet season (mean daily temperature > 30 °C) to ∼ 20 days during the cool, dry season (< 22 °C). Restricting the application of insecticide reduced the seasonal persistence periods to ∼ 10–15 days if only the legs and belly were treated, ∼ 5–15 days if only the legs were treated and < 5 days for the more restricted treatments. The restricted application did not affect the landing distribution of tsetse or the duration of landing bouts (mean = 30 s). The results suggest that more cost-effective control of tsetse could be achieved by applying insecticide to the belly and legs of cattle at 2-week intervals, rather than using the current practice of treating the whole body of each animal at monthly intervals. This would cut the cost of insecticide by 40%, improve efficacy by 27% and reduce the threats to non-target organisms and the enzootic stability of tick-borne diseases.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Glossina, cattle, deltamethrin, insecticide-treated cattle, trypanosomiasis, tsetse, vector control, Zimbabwe
Subjects: S Agriculture > SF Animal culture
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 21 Dec 2012 14:07
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/2405

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