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Translational findings on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and anxiety: Contributions from basic research to clinical practice

Translational findings on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and anxiety: Contributions from basic research to clinical practice

Silveira, Anna Claudia Domingos, Pereira Dias, Gisele ORCID: 0000-0001-7276-2010, Bevilaqua, Mário Cesar do Nascimento, Cocks, Graham, Gardino, Patricia Franca, Thuret, Sandrine and Nardi, Antonio Egidio (2013) Translational findings on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and anxiety: Contributions from basic research to clinical practice. Neuropsychobiology, 68. pp. 129-138. ISSN 0302-282X (Print), 1423-0224 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1159/000353269)

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Abstract

Background/Aims: Anxious responses are evolutionarily adaptive, but excessive fear can become disabling and lead to anxiety disorders. Translational models of anxiety might be useful sources for understanding the neurobiology of fear and anxiety and can contribute to future proposals of therapeutic intervention for the disorders studied. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is known for its importance on neuroplasticity and contextual memory, has emerged as a relevant element for emotional memory. Re- cent studies show that the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism correlates with various psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, but there are several differences between experimental and clinical studies. Methods: In this work, we review the literature focused on the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and anxiety, and discuss biological findings from animal models to clinical studies. Results: As occurs with other psychiatric disorders, anxiety correlates with anatomical, behavioral and physiological changes related to the BDNF polymorphism. In animal studies, it has been shown that a significant decrease in regulated secretion from both BDNFVal/Met and BDNFMet/Met neurons represented a significant decrease in available BDNF. Conclusion: These studies suggest that developing pharmacological strategies facilitating the release of BDNF from synapses or prolongation of the half-life of secreted BDNF may improve the therapeutic responses of humans expressing the BDNF polymorphism.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Anxiety · Brain-derived neurotrophic factor · Humans · Mouse model · Translational research · Val66Met polymorphism
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 04 Jul 2019 14:47
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/23932

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