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A surgical team simulation to improve teamwork and communication across two continents: ViSIOT™ proof-of-concept study

A surgical team simulation to improve teamwork and communication across two continents: ViSIOT™ proof-of-concept study

Weldon, Sharon Marie ORCID: 0000-0001-5487-5265, Korkiakangas, Terhi, Calzada, Jennifer, Korndorffer, James R. and Kneebone, Roger L. (2019) A surgical team simulation to improve teamwork and communication across two continents: ViSIOT™ proof-of-concept study. Journal of Surgical Education, 76 (5). pp. 1413-1424. ISSN 1931-7204 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsurg.2019.03.016)

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Abstract

Background:
Team communication in operating rooms is problematic worldwide, and can negatively impact patient safety. Although initiatives such as the World Health Organization’s Surgical Safety Checklist have been introduced to improve communication, patient safety continues to be compromised globally, warranting the development of new interventions. Video-based social science methods have contributed to the study of communication in UK ORs through actual observations of surgical teams in practice. Drawing on this, the authors have developed a surgical team simulation-training model (ViSIOT™). A proof-of-concept study was conducted in the UK and USA to assess if the ViSIOT™ simulation-training has applicability and acceptability beyond the UK.

Methods:
ViSIOT™ training was conducted at two simulation centers in the UK and USA over a 10-month period. All surgical team participants completed a questionnaire (that assessed design, education, satisfaction and self-confidence in relation to the training). Descriptive and inferential statistics were performed for the quantitative data and thematic analysis was conducted for the qualitative data.

Results:
There was strong agreement from all participants in terms of their perception of the course across all sub-sections measured. Nine themes from the qualitative data were identified. The two countries shared most themes, however, some emerged that were unique to each country.

Conclusions:
Practical developments in the course design, technology and recruitment were identified. Evidence of the course applicability in the USA provides further affirmation of the universal need for team communication training within ORs. Further studies are required to assess its effectiveness in improving communication in OR practice.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: simulation, teamwork, communication, surgery
Subjects: R Medicine > RD Surgery
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Adult Nursing & Paramedic Science
Last Modified: 02 Sep 2019 09:09
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/23767

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