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How simulation techniques and approaches can be used to compare, contrast and improve care: an immersive simulation of a three-Michelin star restaurant and a day surgery unit

How simulation techniques and approaches can be used to compare, contrast and improve care: an immersive simulation of a three-Michelin star restaurant and a day surgery unit

Weldon, Sharon Marie ORCID: 0000-0001-5487-5265, Korkiakangas, Terhi and Kneebone, Roger (2019) How simulation techniques and approaches can be used to compare, contrast and improve care: an immersive simulation of a three-Michelin star restaurant and a day surgery unit. BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning. ISSN 2056-6697 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjstel-2018-000433)

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Abstract

In this editorial, we present a short 5 min documentary-style film to explore how immersive distributed simulation can be used to engage members of the public in the experience of care in order to generate a wider discussion on what care means.

Traditionally, and more commonly, simulation in healthcare has been used for training, quality improvement and assessment purposes. Although this is an obvious and effective use of simulation techniques, little thought has been given to how simulation could be used beyond this.1 2 Furthermore, Kneebone3 argues that the current use of simulation has mirrored practice by restricting it to a clinical ‘insider’ frame, excluding patients, families, the public and even managers, commissioners, policymakers and other sectors from its purpose, design and implementation, although these perspectives are an essential component of clinical practice that could enhance current approaches to care. Current utilisation of simulation techniques and approaches often focuses on single elements of healthcare that mirror healthcare practices rather than looking to transform them, and with limited external involvement. However, we believe its application can be much wider than its current scope. By capitalising on simulations' main benefits (the ability to recreate realistic healthcare scenarios in a safe environment), we have been testing’s simulations applicability for a range of objectives.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Simulation; fine dining; care; day surgery; communication
Subjects: R Medicine > RD Surgery
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Adult Nursing & Paramedic Science
Last Modified: 02 Oct 2019 09:33
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/23766

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