Skip navigation

A comparison of coffee floral traits under two different agricultural practices

A comparison of coffee floral traits under two different agricultural practices

Prado, Sara Guiti, Collazo, Jaime A., Stevenson, Philip C. ORCID: 0000-0002-0736-3619 and Irwin, Rebecca E. (2019) A comparison of coffee floral traits under two different agricultural practices. Scientific Reports, 9:7331. ISSN 2045-2322 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-43753-y)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Publisher's PDF - Open Access)
23736 STEVENSON_A_Comparison_of_Coffee_Floral_Traits_(OA)_2019.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (Author Accepted Manuscript)
23736 STEVENSON_A_Comparison_of_Coffee_Floral_Traits_(AAM)_2019.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (531kB) | Preview

Abstract

Floral traits and rewards are important in mediating interactions between plants and pollinators. Agricultural management practices can affect abiotic factors known to influence floral traits; however, our understanding of the links between agricultural practices and floral trait expression is still poorly understood. Variation in floral morphological, nectar, and pollen traits of two important agricultural species, Coffea arabica and C. canephora, was assessed under different agricultural practices (sun and shade). Corolla diameter and corolla tube length were larger and pollen total nitrogen content greater in shade plantations of C. canephora than sun plantations. Corolla tube length and anther filament length were larger in shade plantations of C. arabica. No effect of agricultural practice was found on nectar volume, sugar or caffeine concentrations, or pollen production. Pollen total nitrogen content was lower in sun than shade plantations of C. canephora, but no difference was found between sun and shade for C. arabica. This study is the first to provide baseline data on the influence of agronomic practices on C. arabica and C. canephora floral traits and also helps fill a gap in knowledge about the effects of shade trees on floral traits, which can be pertinent to other agroforestry systems.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2019. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Uncontrolled Keywords: coffee nectar triats
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Chemical Ecology Research Group
Last Modified: 31 Jul 2019 11:27
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/23736

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics