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Self-gentrification as a pro-active response to tourism development: Cases of Indigenous entrepreneurship in mainland China and Taiwan

Self-gentrification as a pro-active response to tourism development: Cases of Indigenous entrepreneurship in mainland China and Taiwan

Chan, Jin ORCID: 0000-0002-6275-9763, Chen, Shih-Yu, Ji, Zhongjuan, Zhang, Ying and Qi, Xiaoguang (2019) Self-gentrification as a pro-active response to tourism development: Cases of Indigenous entrepreneurship in mainland China and Taiwan. In: Colbourne, Rick and Anderson, Robert, (eds.) Indigenous Self‐Determination and Sustainable Economic Development. Routledge. (In Press)

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Abstract

Indigenous tourism could be a mixed blessing with multi-faceted complexity of diverse issues ranging from socio-economic benefits to those of political rights. It could also determine the sustainability of the surrounding natural environment and Indigenous cultural heritage. While self-determination is to be respected and hegemony of any kind is to be resisted, social and economy development in the Indigenous communities require supports, knowledge and networks with the wider society.

This chapter offers two case-studies of entrepreneurial endeavours in Indigenous communities in Asia where there are attempts to develop their socio-economic status under their own terms, while conserving their own cultural heritage (self-gentrification), in response to gentrification pressure (as well as opportunities) coming from tourism development and associated modernisation. The first case examines the intentions to engage in entrepreneurial activities in tourism sector and the efforts to improve capabilities and provide resources to the ethnic communities in the Honghe Hani Rice Terraces UNESCO Cultural Landscape World Heritage Site in Yunnan province, mainland China. The second case of Chi-mei community in Taiwan offers some insights on successful collaborations of Indigenous community with national museums to develop tourism economy and entrepreneurship while enhancing the appreciation and conservation of Indigenous heritage.

Item Type: Book Section
Uncontrolled Keywords: self-gentrification, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Chi-mei, Hani, rice terrace, Honghe, Yunnan, indigenous tourism
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of Systems Management & Strategy
Faculty of Business > Networks and Urban Systems Centre (NUSC)
Faculty of Business > Networks and Urban Systems Centre (NUSC) > Supply Chain Management Research Group
Last Modified: 14 May 2019 16:30
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 4
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/23676

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