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Pastoral community coping and adaptation strategies to manage household food insecurity consequent to climatic hazards in the cattle corridor of Uganda

Pastoral community coping and adaptation strategies to manage household food insecurity consequent to climatic hazards in the cattle corridor of Uganda

Mayanja, Maureen Nanziri, Rubaire-Akiki, Chris, Morton, John and Kabasa, John David (2019) Pastoral community coping and adaptation strategies to manage household food insecurity consequent to climatic hazards in the cattle corridor of Uganda. Climate and Development. ISSN 1756-5529 (Print), 1756-5537 (Online) (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/17565529.2019.1605283)

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Abstract

Establishing short and long term measures that pastoral and agropastoral households use to ensure they have access to food in periods of climate extremes could provide insights into ways to support households in similar conditions. Using semi structured elicitation, 15 purposively selected participants from case households and 13 community leaders, in the central cattle corridor of Uganda were interviewed in January to February 2013. Thematic analysis revealed four coping strategies: harvesting immature food crops, selling off cattle, searching for alternative water sources and using alternative non-production based means to access food. The three adaptation strategies identified were: diversifying livelihood activities, changing agricultural practices and investing in alternative water sources. Several adaptation strategies were related to incremental crop system changes, to maintain the existing way of practice. However some strategies were transformational, like formerly specialised livestock keepers taking on crop farming. Some strategies presented environmentally erosive effects; a mechanism to curb this would be to evaluate the opportunity cost of diversification and transformative practices in relation to incremental adaptation. Insights gleaned could assist researchers to consider aspects for in-depth adaptation analysis and inform on how policies and institutions in Uganda could be used to facilitate, rather than undermine, pastoralists’ coping and adaptation; and thus guide development interventions to strengthen food security.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Adaptation, Copping, Climate Risk, Household Food Insecurity, Pastoralism
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Development Studies Research Group
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Livelihoods & Institutions Department
Last Modified: 16 May 2019 09:31
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 5
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/23428

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