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Can narrative medicine education contribute to the delivery of compassionate care? A review of the literature

Can narrative medicine education contribute to the delivery of compassionate care? A review of the literature

Barber, Sarah and Moreno-Leguizamon, Carlos J. ORCID: 0000-0002-4294-3387 (2017) Can narrative medicine education contribute to the delivery of compassionate care? A review of the literature. Medical Humanities, 43 (3). pp. 199-203. ISSN 1468-215X (Print), 1473-4265 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011242)

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Abstract

Narrative Medicine has emerged as a discipline from within the medical humanities and takes inspiration from philosophy, literature, poetry, art and social sciences theories. In particular, it is underpinned by philosophical approaches such as phenomenology, postmodernism and narratology, proposing that clinicians must attend to the lived experience of their patients and apply the science to the person. Meanwhile, the link between medicine and literature is evident in the growing volume of texts written about professionals', or lay people's experiences of illness and disease. In exploring this link further, Charon has contributed greatly to consolidate the theory of Narrative Medicine. She defines it as ‘medicine practiced with the narrative competencies to recognise, absorb, interpret and be moved by the stories of illness’. She suggests that, in exploring texts and reading them closely, one finds the tools of language such as metaphor, plot, character and temporality. She suggests that learning such skills enables clinicians to recognise that same language when it appears in clinical interaction practice. This ‘narrative competence’ can be fostered through education initiatives that particularly explore literature, creative and reflective writing, storytelling and poetry.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Narrative medicine education; Compassionate care
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 17 May 2019 16:22
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 5
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/23327

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