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The benefits of a health impact assessment in relation to fuel poverty: assessing Luton's affordable warmth strategy and the need for a national strategy

The benefits of a health impact assessment in relation to fuel poverty: assessing Luton's affordable warmth strategy and the need for a national strategy

Stewart, Jill and Habgood, Veronica (2008) The benefits of a health impact assessment in relation to fuel poverty: assessing Luton's affordable warmth strategy and the need for a national strategy. The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, 128 (3). pp. 123-129. ISSN 1466-4240 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/1466424008089797)

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The links between fuel poverty and poor health are well documented, yet there is no statutory requirement on local authorities to develop fuel poverty strategies, which tend to be patchy nationally and differ substantially in quality. Fuel poverty starts from the perspective of income, even though interventions can improve health. The current public health agenda calls for more partnership-based, cost-effective strategies based on sound evidence. Fuel poverty represents a key area where there is currently little local evidence quantifying and qualifying health gain
arising from strategic interventions. As a result, this initial study sought to apply the principles of a health impact assessment to Luton’s Affordable Warmth Strategy, exploring the potential to identify health impact arising – as a baseline for future research – in the context of the public health agenda. A national strategy would help ensure the promotion of targeted fuel poverty strategies.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: From the beginning of 2009, The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health changed its name to Perspectives in Public Health - this journal title at time of publication is used.
Uncontrolled Keywords: affordable warmth, fuel, poverty, housing and health, health impact assessment, Luton Borough Council
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Health & Social Care > Department of Health Development
School of Health & Social Care
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:06
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/2303

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