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Conceptualizing the executive mayoralty as a pseudo-event: a comparative investigation of a new trend in municipal leadership

Conceptualizing the executive mayoralty as a pseudo-event: a comparative investigation of a new trend in municipal leadership

Schnee, Christian (2019) Conceptualizing the executive mayoralty as a pseudo-event: a comparative investigation of a new trend in municipal leadership. Contemporary Politics. pp. 1-19. ISSN 1356-9775 (Print), 1469-3631 (Online) (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/13569775.2018.1563853)

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Abstract

This paper assesses a new trend and details how the executive mayoralty in the UK has morphed into a tool that allows politicians to advance their respective political agenda and generate images of achievement by exerting their leverage with the national media. Drawing on Boorstin's concept of pseudo-events as an interpretive prism it is argued that in a range of countries the executive mayoralty has for years been used by high-profile mayors to build personal reputation, retain or create party political loyalty and enhance support among the electorate. As a result the mayoral office becomes more appealing to politicians who intend to attain high office and look for a way to make their names and policies widely recognized with voters nationally. Thus municipal leadership in the UK constitutes an alternative route for politicians who aspire to party leadership or ministerial office.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Pseudo-event, political communication, municipal politics, executive mayor, communication management, political PR
Subjects: J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of Marketing, Events & Tourism
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2019 11:59
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/22916

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