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Modernisations of Polish identities in contemporary Polish plays: The right to individuality

Modernisations of Polish identities in contemporary Polish plays: The right to individuality

Oxley, Natasha ORCID: 0000-0003-0011-7113 (2016) Modernisations of Polish identities in contemporary Polish plays: The right to individuality. In: WORKING PAPERS: Post-1945 Poland: Modernities, Transformations and Evolving Identities. POMP, London, pp. 147-159.

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Abstract

With the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, Polish playwrights were released from the stranglehold of communist censorship, becoming free to do and say whatever they liked in whatever ways they chose, no longer bound within the confines of allegorical stage languages when addressing political issues. While clandestine, politicised performances did take place under communism, the content of mainstream theatre was officially controlled by the censor. After 1989 there was an initial brief wave of restagings of classics, Western European plays, and psychological dramas. Then there came a surge of contemporary new Polish playwriting which once again engaged with politics, but now the writers had freedom of speech and freedom of artistic expression. Marginalised characters were placed in the spotlight, demanding to be heard. They frequently did so in ‘real’, though not realistic, language, often full of obscenities. Since Poland’s accession to the European Union in 2004, contemporary Polish playwrights have continued to engage with the ongoing processes of reshaping Polish identities and tackling national stereotypes. This paper focuses on a selection of plays written after that important moment in Poland’s cultural history.

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
Title of Proceedings: WORKING PAPERS: Post-1945 Poland: Modernities, Transformations and Evolving Identities
Additional Information: This paper was based on a presentation given at two-day postgraduate conference organized by the Programme on Modern Poland (St Antony’s College, University of Oxford) in June 2015, prior to my appointment at Greenwich.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Post-1989, Playwriting, Theatre, World War Two, Polish-German relations, Polish-Russian relations, Polish-Jewish relations, Jedwabne, Historiography, Memory studies, Memorialisation, Homosexuality, Catholic Church
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PG Slavic, Baltic, Albanian languages and literature
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities
Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > Department of Literature, Language & Theatre
Last Modified: 15 May 2019 10:33
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 1
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/22355

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