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Cultural differences in psychosis: The role of causal beliefs and stigma in White British and South Asians

Cultural differences in psychosis: The role of causal beliefs and stigma in White British and South Asians

Mirza, Aisha, Birtel, Michele D. ORCID: 0000-0002-2383-9197, Pyle, Melissa and Morrison, Anthony (2019) Cultural differences in psychosis: The role of causal beliefs and stigma in White British and South Asians. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. ISSN 0022-0221 (Print), 1552-5422 (Online) (In Press) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022118820168)

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Abstract

While previous research has demonstrated the negative impact of stigma in individuals with mental health problems, little is known about cross-cultural differences in experiences and explanations of mental health, in particular in young people, despite the first episode of psychosis often occurring in adolescence. Aim of this study was to examine cultural differences in causal beliefs and stigma towards mental health, in particular psychosis. White British and South Asian young people (N = 128) from two schools and colleges in the United Kingdom, aged 16-20 years, completed a cross-sectional survey. Results revealed significant associations between ethnic group and our dependent measures. White British reported more previous contact with a mental health service as well as with people with mental health problems than South Asians. They also reported lower stigma in form of a greater intentions to engage in contact with people with mental health problems. Furthermore, South Asians reported higher beliefs in supernatural causes of psychosis than White British. Psychotic experiences moderated the effect of ethnic group on supernatural beliefs, with South Asians reporting higher supernatural beliefs than White British when their own psychotic experiences were low to moderate. We discuss the implications of the findings, arguing that a greater culture-sensitive understanding of mental health is important to reach ethnic minorities with psychosis, and to challenge stigma towards psychosis from an early age on.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: mental health, psychosis, stigma, cultural differences, South Asians, causal beliefs, supernatural attitudes
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Applied Psychology Research Group
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 01 Feb 2019 08:43
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/22294

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