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The effect of thiamine-coating nanoparticles on their biodistribution and fate following oral administration

The effect of thiamine-coating nanoparticles on their biodistribution and fate following oral administration

Inchaurraga, Laura, Martínez-López, Ana L., Cattoz, Beatrice, Griffiths, Peter C. ORCID: 0000-0002-6686-1271, Wilcox, Matthey, Pearson, Jeffrey P., Quincoces, Gemma, Peñuelas, Iván, Martin-Arbella, Nekane and Irache, Juan M. (2018) The effect of thiamine-coating nanoparticles on their biodistribution and fate following oral administration. European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 128. pp. 81-90. ISSN 0928-0987 (Print), 1879-0720 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejps.2018.11.025)

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Abstract

Thiamine-coated nanoparticles were prepared by two different preparative methods and evaluated to compare their mucus-penetrating properties and fate in vivo. The first method of preparation consisted of surface modification of freshly poly(anhydride) nanoparticles (NP) by simple incubation with thiamine (T-NPA). The second procedure focused on the preparation and characterization of a new polymeric conjugate between the poly(anhydride) backbone and thiamine prior the nanoparticle formation (T-NPB). The resulting nanoparticles displayed comparable sizes (about 200 nm) and slightly negative surface charges. For T-NPA, the amount of thiamine associated to the surface of the nanoparticles was 15 µg/mg. For in vivo studies, nanoparticles were labeled with either 99mTc or Lumogen® Red. T-NPA and T-NPB moved faster from the stomach to the small intestine than naked nanoparticles. Two hours post-administration, for T-NPA and T-NPB, more than 30% of the given dose was found in close contact with the intestinal mucosa, compared with a 13.5% for NP. Interestingly, both types of thiamine-coated nanoparticles showed a greater ability to cross the mucus layer and interact with the surface of the intestinal epithelium than NP, which remained adhered in the mucus layer. Four hours post-administration, around 35% of T-NPA and T-NPB were localized in the ileum of animals. Overall, both preparative processes yielded thiamine decorated carriers with similar physico-chemical and biodistribution properties, increasing the versatility of these nanocarriers as oral delivery systems for a number of biologically active compounds.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: mucin, drug delivery, pgse-nmr
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > School of Science (SCI)
Last Modified: 24 Nov 2019 01:38
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/22283

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