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Influence of parental overweight on the association of birth weight and fat distribution later in childhood

Influence of parental overweight on the association of birth weight and fat distribution later in childhood

Adegboye, A.R.A ORCID: 0000-0003-2780-0350, Andersen, L.B., Wedderkopp, N. and Heitmann, B.L. (2012) Influence of parental overweight on the association of birth weight and fat distribution later in childhood. Obesity facts, 5 (5). pp. 784-794. ISSN 1662-4025 (Print), 1662-4033 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1159/000343916)

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Abstract

Objective: To examine whether the association between birth weight and fat distribution in childhood is modified by parental overweight. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 728 Danish children aged 8–10 and 14–16 years. The main outcomes were waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, subscapular skinfold, and subscapular-to-triceps skinfold ratio. Analyses were stratified by parental overweight status (none vs. ≥1 overweight parent) for each dependent variable, expressed as z-scores. Results: Birth weight z-score was negatively associated with waist circumference (β –0.08 SD; 95% CI –0.15, –0.02), waist-to-height ratio (β –0.15 SD; 95% CI –0.22, –0.07), and subscapular-to-triceps ratio (β –0.28 SD; 95% CI –0.44, –0.12) after adjustment for sex, age, puberty, preterm birth, BMI, height, socio-economic status, mother’s age at delivery, parity, breastfeeding, energy intake, and aerobic fitness in the group with ≥1 overweight parent. Birth weight was negatively associated with subscapular skinfold in groups with (β –0.16 SD; 95% CI –0.24, –0.06) and without overweight parents (β –0.09 SD; 95% CI –0.16, –0.02), but the magnitude of the association was greater in the former group. Conclusion: The association between birth weight and fat distribution seems to be influenced by parental overweight. Lower birth weights are associated with central adiposity among offspring of overweight parents.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: fetal development, adiposity, fat distribution, children, adolescents
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development
Faculty of Education, Health & Human Sciences > Institute for Lifecourse Development > Centre for Chronic Illness and Ageing
Last Modified: 06 Apr 2020 11:27
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
Selected for REF2021: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/22138

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