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Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Australia: distribution, detection and discovery of naturally occurring defective DNA molecules

Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Australia: distribution, detection and discovery of naturally occurring defective DNA molecules

van Brunschot, S. L. ORCID: 0000-0002-9634-9463, Persley, D. M., Geering, A. D. W., Campbell, P. R. and Thomas, J. E. (2010) Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Australia: distribution, detection and discovery of naturally occurring defective DNA molecules. Australasian Plant Pathology, 39 (5). pp. 412-423. ISSN 0156-0972 (Print), 1448-6032 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1071/AP10083)

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Abstract

Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) was detected for the first time in Australia in March 2006 in field-grown tomatoes in Brisbane, Queensland. Surveys showed that the virus was confined to south-east Queensland. Virus transmission studies carried out using Bemisia tabaci (B biotype) verified that resistant tomato lines containing the Ty-1 or Ty-5 genes displayed tolerance to infection by TYLCV isolates from Australia. A PCR assay specific for TYLCV was designed and optimised to confirm the presence of the virus in samples that tested positive in begomovirus-specific double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Eight isolates of TYLCV from various sites were cloned and sequenced, and were shown to have near-identical sequences and a high nucleotide sequence similarity (98%) to the monopartite Tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Israel (TYLCV-IL). No DNA-B, DNA-1 nor DNA-b satellite molecules were detected using degenerate PCR assays. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Australian isolates of TYLCV separated into two sequence groups, TYLCV-IL[Au:Bri:06] and TYLCV-IL[Au:Bun:06], that showed a defined geographic segregation. Naturally occurring defective DNA molecules containing partial, rearranged segments of the native DNA-A, were present in one isolate. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an incursion of a begomovirus into Australia, and the first report of the characterisation of naturally occurring defective DNAs of TYLCV. Additional keywords: diagnostics, Geminiviridae, rolling-circle amplification, virus host range.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: diagnostics, Geminiviridae, rolling-circle amplification, virus host range.
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Plant Health Research Group
Last Modified: 19 Oct 2018 23:48
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/21897

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