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Development of emotional competencies, stress and job satisfaction: implications of a mind-body programme

Development of emotional competencies, stress and job satisfaction: implications of a mind-body programme

Gruicsity, Dusan Gruicic (2016) Development of emotional competencies, stress and job satisfaction: implications of a mind-body programme. PhD thesis, University of Greenwich.

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Abstract

The thesis presents research on the effects of a Mind-Body (M-B) training programme on emotional competencies, stress and job satisfaction. This is of practical importance for the workplace, as stress and job satisfaction are important management issues. The theoretical contributions of this research relate to the debate around whether emotional competencies can be developed or not, the mediating role of emotional competencies between the intensity of M-B training, and stress and job satisfaction, and the underlying mechanism of these effects, i.e how M-B training functions and hence why the effects occur.

The M-B training programme lasted eight weeks and was tested on 106 participants. The participants were split into two groups: an experimental and a control group. The experimental group practiced the training programme, while the control did not. Dependent variables were measured using questionnaires both before and after the training programme. The participants had an open question at post-intervention survey about how they felt during M-B practice.

The research also included a qualitative longitudinal study. Nine participants were interviewed immediately after the M-B training intervention, and again one year later in order to see whether the effects were sustained. Hence, this research was conducted as a longitudinal mixed methods design.

The results reveal that M-B training has an effect on emotional competencies, stress and job satisfaction. These improved between 10-26%. The study also found that the ability to manage and regulate emotions play a mediating role between the intensity of M-B training and perceived stress, but not job satisfaction. The qualitative data suggests that mental skills might play a mediating role. Finally, the results reveal that physical, emotional, mental and spiritual mechanisms explain how M-B training works.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Uncontrolled Keywords: emotional competencies, job satisfaction, mind-body training, stress
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of Accounting & Finance
Last Modified: 17 Sep 2018 15:21
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/21517

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