Skip navigation

Tracking butterfly movements with harmonic radar reveals an effect of population age on movement distance

Tracking butterfly movements with harmonic radar reveals an effect of population age on movement distance

Ovaskainen, Otso, Smith, Alan D., Osborne, Juliet L., Reynolds, Don R. ORCID: 0000-0001-8749-7491, Carreck, Norman L., Martin, Andrew P., Niitepõld, Kristjan and Hanski, Ilkka (2008) Tracking butterfly movements with harmonic radar reveals an effect of population age on movement distance. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105 (49). pp. 19090-19095. ISSN 0027-8424 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0802066105)

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

We used harmonic radar to track freely flying Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) females within an area of 30 ha. Butterflies originated from large and continuous populations in China and Estonia, and from newly established or old (> 5 years) small local populations in a highly fragmented landscape in Finland.
Caterpillars were raised under common garden conditions and
unmated females were tested soon after eclosion. The reconstructed flight paths for 66 individuals comprised a total distance of 51 km with high spatial resolution. Butterflies originating from large continuous populations and from old local populations in Finland exhibited similar movement behaviors, whereas butterflies
originating from newly established local populations in the fragmented landscape in Finland moved significantly more than the others. There was no difference in the lengths of individual flight bouts, but the new-population females flew more frequently, resulting in longer daily movement tracks. The flight activity of all individuals was affected by environmental conditions, peaking at 19–23°C (depending on population type), in the early afternoon, and during calm weather. Butterflies from all population types showed a strong tendency to follow habitat edges between the open study area and the neighboring woodlands.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: evolution of dispersal, Glanville fritillary, fight behavior, edge-following, fragmented habitat
Subjects: Q Science > QL Zoology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2015 14:00
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/2142

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item