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Exploring public views on marine litter in Europe: Perceived causes, consequences and pathways to change

Exploring public views on marine litter in Europe: Perceived causes, consequences and pathways to change

Hartley, Bonny L. ORCID: 0000-0002-2501-1924, Pahl, Sabine, Veiga, Joana, Vlachogianni, Thomais, Vasconcelos, Lia, Maes, Thomas, Doyle, Tom, d'Arcy Metcalfe, Ryan, Öztürk, Ayaka Amaha, Di Berardo, Mara and Thompson, Richard C. (2018) Exploring public views on marine litter in Europe: Perceived causes, consequences and pathways to change. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 133. pp. 945-955. ISSN 0025-326X (Print), 1879-3363 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.05.061)

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Abstract

Marine litter is a global challenge and society plays an important role via lifestyles and behaviour, including policy support. We analysed public perceptions of marine litter and contributing factors, using data from 1133 respondents across 16 European countries. People reported high levels of concern about marine litter, and the vast majority (95%) reported seeing litter when visiting the coast. The problem was attributed to product and packaging design and behaviour rather than lack of facilities or accidental loss of items. Retailers, industry and government were perceived as most responsible, but also least motivated and competent to reduce marine litter, whereas scientists and environmental groups were perceived as least responsible but most motivated and competent. Regression analyses demonstrated the importance of psychological factors such as values and social norms above socio-demographic variables. These findings are important for communications and interventions to reduce inputs of marine litter to the natural environment.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: marine debris, public understanding, perception, concern, behaviour, intention
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Applied Psychology Research Group
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 20 May 2019 06:23
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 2
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/21084

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