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The contribution of cool and hot executive function to academic achievement, learning-related behaviours, and classroom behaviour

The contribution of cool and hot executive function to academic achievement, learning-related behaviours, and classroom behaviour

O'Toole, Sarah E., Monks, Claire P. ORCID: 0000-0003-2638-181X, Tsermentseli, Stella and Rix, Katie (2018) The contribution of cool and hot executive function to academic achievement, learning-related behaviours, and classroom behaviour. Early Child Development and Care. ISSN 0300-4430 (Print), 1476-8275 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/03004430.2018.1494595)

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Abstract

The primary aim of this study was to examine whether individual differences in cool and hot executive functions (EF) were associated with children’s transition to school, in terms of both academic performance and classroom behaviour. Children between 5- and 7-years-of-age (N = 90) completed performance based assessments of cool and hot EF as well as verbal ability. Teachers reported on children’s reading and numeracy performance, learning-related behaviours, hyperactivity, and aggression. Results revealed that EF, in particular working memory, was associated with reading and numeracy performance and that this relation was mediated by learning-related behaviours. EF was not associated with hyperactive or aggressive behaviour. The findings strengthen the evidence base for the importance of EF in early academic performance and underscore its potential to be a beneficial part of early education curriculum and a target for early intervention for successful transition to school.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Executive function, early academic achievement, learning-behaviours, aggression, early childhood
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 26 Sep 2019 15:12
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/20543

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