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The role of every-day executive function in social impairment and adaptive skills in Autism Spectrum Disorder with intellectual disability

The role of every-day executive function in social impairment and adaptive skills in Autism Spectrum Disorder with intellectual disability

Tsermentseli, Stella, Tabares, Jeannette Farago and Kouklari, Evangelia Chrysanthi (2018) The role of every-day executive function in social impairment and adaptive skills in Autism Spectrum Disorder with intellectual disability. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 53. pp. 1-6. ISSN 1750-9467 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rasd.2018.05.006)

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Abstract

Background:
Although executive function (EF) deficits are a recognised component of the cognitive phenotype of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), particularly in children without general intellectual delay, little is known about ecological measures of EF and their outcome correlates among individuals with ASD and co-occurring intellectual disability. This exploratory study examined every-day EF in the classroom among children and adolescents diagnosed with both ASD and intellectual disability (ASD-ID) and their correlations with social impairment anadaptive functioning.

Method:
Teachers of 40 children and adolescents diagnosed with ASD-ID completed the
Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, and the Social Responsiveness Scale.

Results:
A global executive dysfunction profile was found in ASD-ID, with most prominent deficits occurring in shifting. Results also showed that metacognitive executive processes predicted adaptive communication skills above and beyond IQ and social impairment in ASD-ID.

Conclusions:
Our findings corroborate a specific metacognitive executive function-adaptive communication association in ASD. EF interventions might be important treatment targets for improving functioning, especially in the communicative domain, in ASD-ID.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ASD; Intellectual disability; Executive function; Adaptive functioning
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 15 May 2019 11:25
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 6
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/20487

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