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Managing aflatoxin in smallholder groundnut production in Southern Africa: Paired comparison of the windrow and Mandela cock techniques

Managing aflatoxin in smallholder groundnut production in Southern Africa: Paired comparison of the windrow and Mandela cock techniques

Matumba, Limbikani, Singano, Lazarus, Tran, Bruno, Mukanga, Mweshi, Makwenda, Beatrice, Kumwenda, Wycliffe, Mgwira, Sharif, Phiri, Sam, Mataya, Frazer, Mthunzi, Talentus, Alfred, Sharon, Madzivhandila, Tshilidzi, Mugabe, Jonas, Bennett, Ben and Chancellor, Tim ORCID: 0000-0002-4442-7001 (2018) Managing aflatoxin in smallholder groundnut production in Southern Africa: Paired comparison of the windrow and Mandela cock techniques. Crop Protection, 112. pp. 18-23. ISSN 0261-2194 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cropro.2018.05.007)

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Abstract

Timely drying of groundnuts is important after harvest. In most parts of sub-Saharan Africa, moisture content reduction is practically achieved by solar drying. In particular, the groundnuts are traditionally cured in the field using the inverted windrow drying technique. Recently, the Mandela cock technique, a ventilated stack of groundnut plants with a chimney at the center, has been introduced in the southern Africa region with the aim of reducing moisture content and the risk of aflatoxin contamination. An on-farm study was conducted in Malawi to compare the effectiveness of the Mandela cock and Windrow drying techniques with respect to aflatoxin control. For two consecutive years, farmers (2016, n = 29; 2017; n = 26) were recruited to test each of the two drying techniques. A mixed-design ANOVA showed that the Mandela cock groundnut drying technique led to sig- nificantly (p < 0.001) higher aflatoxin levels in groundnut seed compared to the traditional inverted windrow drying (5.7 μg/kg, geometric mean vs 2.5 μg/kg in 2016 and 37.6 μg/kg vs 8.4 μg/kg in 2017). The present findings clearly demonstrate the need for regulation and technology validation if farmers and consumers are to benefit.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Aflatoxin; Groundnuts; Drying; Food safety; Mandela cock; Inverted windrow;
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Last Modified: 14 Mar 2019 11:24
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/20422

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