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Analysis of free fatty acids in food substrates and in the dust and frass of stored-product pests: Potential for species discrimination?

Analysis of free fatty acids in food substrates and in the dust and frass of stored-product pests: Potential for species discrimination?

Stewart-Jones, A., Stirrup, T.J., Hodges, R.J., Farman, D.I. and Hall, D.R. ORCID: 0000-0002-7887-466X (2009) Analysis of free fatty acids in food substrates and in the dust and frass of stored-product pests: Potential for species discrimination? Journal of Stored Products Research, 45 (2). pp. 119-124. ISSN 0022-474X (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jspr.2008.10.003)

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Abstract

The larger grain borer, Prostephanus truncatus, is a serious beetle pest that tunnels extensively to produce large quantities of dust and frass. The natural enemy Teretrius nigrescens is an important biological control beetle which is known to exploit at close-range solvent-extractable chemical cues in the dust and frass. The objective of the current study was to analyse quantitatively and qualitatively, the free fatty acid mixtures in different food-substrate materials both before and after insect attack by a range of stored-product pests in order to ascertain whether differences in these mixtures could explain the T. nigrescens selectivity to P. truncatus dust/frass over that of other species irrespective of food substrate. By TLC, GC and GC–MS we found triglyceride and five free fatty acids were the most abundant chemicals in dust/frass (palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2) and linolenic acid (C18:3)). In maize flour, Sitophilus species did not significantly change free fatty acid concentrations whereas with P. truncatus, Rhyzopertha dominica and Dinoderus minutus there were 4–6-fold increases, and, for Tribolium species there were over 20-fold increases. These differences provide interesting insights to tunnelling/feeding habits and are correlated with known feeding preferences within grain. Principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrated that free fatty acid ratios in dust/frass of different species are most linked to the food substrate and confer little discriminatory information that could be used to distinguish between the different species. Although increases in free fatty acid concentrations are good indicators of pest infestation and this may contribute behaviourally in an additive or synergistic way, we conclude that other chemical(s) are present and are key to T. nigrescens recognition of P. truncatus on different substrates.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Published in print: April 2009. [2] Published as: Journal of Stored Products Research, (2009), Vol. 45, (2), pp. 119–124.
Uncontrolled Keywords: arrestant, cassava, kairomone, maize, predator, prostephanus truncatus, teretrius nigrescens, triglyceride
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Q Science > QD Chemistry
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Food & Markets Department
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 16:30
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/2024

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