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Secondary transfer effect among children: The role of social dominance orientation and outgroup attitudes

Secondary transfer effect among children: The role of social dominance orientation and outgroup attitudes

Vezzali, Loris, Di Bernardo, Gian Antonio, Stathi, Sofia ORCID: 0000-0002-1218-5239, Cadamuro, Alessia, Lášticová, Barbara and Andraščiková, Simona (2018) Secondary transfer effect among children: The role of social dominance orientation and outgroup attitudes. British Journal of Social Psychology, 57 (3). pp. 547-566. ISSN 0144-6665 (Print), 2044-8309 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12248)

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Abstract

Research has provided evidence that the effects of intergroup contact on prejudice reduction are not limited to the outgroup one has contact with (primary outgroup). Rather, they extend to secondary outgroups uninvolved in the contact situation (secondary transfer effect; Pettigrew, 2009, Social Psychology, 40, 55). We aimed to provide the first empirical evidence for the emergence of the secondary transfer effect among children. Majority (Italian) and minority (with an immigrant background) elementary schoolchildren were administered a questionnaire including measures of contact with the primary outgroup (minority children for the majority, majority children for the minority), prejudice towards the primary outgroup and towards a dissimilar secondary outgroup (disabled children), and social dominance orientation. Results revealed that among the majority group, contact with the primary outgroup had indirect associations with reduced prejudice towards the secondary outgroup. Specifically, we found evidence for sequential mediation by social dominance orientation and prejudice towards the primary outgroup. No secondary transfer effects emerged among minority group members. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings, arguing for the importance of identifying the core processes driving the secondary transfer effect

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: intergroup contact, prejudice, children, secondary transfer effect, social dominance orientation
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Applied Psychology Research Group
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling
Last Modified: 17 May 2019 13:11
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: GREAT d
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 4
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/20083

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