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Applying gaze-contingent training within community settings to infants from diverse SES backgrounds

Applying gaze-contingent training within community settings to infants from diverse SES backgrounds

Ballieux, Haiko, Wass, Sam V., Tomalski, Przemyslaw, Kushnerenko, Elena, Karmiloff-Smith, Annette, Johnson, Mark H. and Moore, Derek G. (2016) Applying gaze-contingent training within community settings to infants from diverse SES backgrounds. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 43. pp. 8-17. ISSN 0193-3973 (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2015.12.005)

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Abstract

Even in infancy children from low-SES backgrounds differ in frontal cortex functioning and, by the start of pre-school, they frequently show poor performance on executive functions including attention control. These differences may causally mediate later difficulties in academic learning. Here, we present a study to assess the feasibility of using computerized paradigms to train attention control in infants, delivered weekly over five sessions in early intervention centres for low-SES families. Thirty-three 12-month-old infants were recruited, of whom 23 completed the training. Our results showed the feasibility of repeat-visit cognitive training within community settings. Training-related improvements were found, relative to active controls, on tasks assessing visual sustained attention, saccadic reaction time, and rule learning, whereas trend improvements were found on assessments of short-term memory. No significant improvements were found in task switching. These results warrant further investigation into the potential of this method for targeting ‘at-risk’ infants in community settings.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cognitive training; Attention training; Early development; Socioeconomic status; Community settings; Infant
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Applied Psychology Research Group
Last Modified: 29 May 2018 15:05
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/19884

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