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Effect of a protein supplement on the gut microbiota of endurance athletes: A randomized, controlled, double-blind pilot study

Effect of a protein supplement on the gut microbiota of endurance athletes: A randomized, controlled, double-blind pilot study

Moreno-Pérez, Diego, Bressa, Carlo, Bailén, María, Hamed-Bousdar, Safa, Naclerio, Fernando ORCID: 0000-0001-7405-4894, Carmona, Manuel, Pérez, Margarita, González-Soltero, Rocío, Montalvo-Lominchar, Maria Gregoria, Carabaña, Claudia and Larrosa, Mar (2018) Effect of a protein supplement on the gut microbiota of endurance athletes: A randomized, controlled, double-blind pilot study. Nutrients, 10 (3):337. ISSN 2072-6643 (Print), 2072-6643 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030337)

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Abstract

Nutritional supplements are popular among athletes to improve performance and physical recovery. Protein supplements fulfill this function by improving performance and increasing muscle mass; however, their effect on other organs or systems is less well known. Diet alterations can induce gut microbiota imbalance, with beneficial or deleterious consequences for the host. To test this, we performed a randomized pilot study in cross-country runners whose diets were complemented with a protein supplement (whey isolate and beef hydrolysate) (n = 12) or maltodextrin (control) (n = 12) for 10 weeks. Microbiota, water content, pH, ammonia, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed in fecal samples, whereas malondialdehyde levels (oxidative stress marker) were determined in plasma and urine. Fecal pH, water content, ammonia, and SCFA concentrations did not change, indicating that protein supplementation did not increase the presence of these fermentation-derived metabolites. Similarly, it had no impact on plasma or urine malondialdehyde levels; however, it increased the abundance of the Bacteroidetes phylum and decreased the presence of health-related taxa including Roseburia, Blautia, and Bifidobacterium longum. Thus, long-term protein supplementation may have a negative impact on gut microbiota. Further research is needed to establish the impact of protein supplements on gut microbiota.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Uncontrolled Keywords: sport supplements; fecal ammonia; Bifidobacterium longum; fecal pH; branched short-chain fatty acids
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Centre for Science and Medicine in Sport and Exercise
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Life & Sports Sciences
Last Modified: 14 Mar 2018 11:14
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/19416

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