Skip navigation

Globalization, entrepreneurship and paradox thinking

Globalization, entrepreneurship and paradox thinking

Prashantham, Shameen, Eranova, Mariya and Couper, Carole (2017) Globalization, entrepreneurship and paradox thinking. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 35 (1). pp. 1-9. ISSN 0217-4561 (Print), 1572-9958 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10490-017-9537-9)

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

Globalization has been facing a backlash. By contrast, entrepreneurship has come to be seen as a panacea for economic development and generating jobs that are perceived to be under threat from globalization. In this Perspectives paper, our central argument is that globalization and entrepreneurship must be viewed holistically, recognizing that globalization is an enabler of important entrepreneurship outcomes. We argue that networks created as a byproduct of globalization facilitate various forms of entrepreneurship. Interpersonal networks (e.g., diasporas) facilitate transnational entrepreneurship which can, in turn, reduce institutional distance between locations. Interorganizational networks (e.g., MNE-orchestrated ecosystems) facilitate technology entrepreneurship which reinforces the institutional work that gives rise to new technological domains and fields. Intergovernmental and civil society networks facilitate social entrepreneurship which helps redress institutional voids. Thus globalization can be a force for good by enabling forms of entrepreneurship that enable important institutional change. We highlight the importance of paradox thinking, which is rooted in ancient Chinese philosophy, in transcending an either/or perspective of globalization and entrepreneurship.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: globalization, entrepreneurship, international entrepreneurship, paradox thinking, institutional change, anti-globalization
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HF Commerce
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Connected Cities Research Group
Faculty of Business > Department of Systems Management & Strategy
Last Modified: 02 May 2018 14:33
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/18520

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item