Skip navigation

Dispersion and domestication shaped the genome of bread wheat

Dispersion and domestication shaped the genome of bread wheat

Berkman, Paul J., Visendi, Paul, Lee, Hong C., Stiller, Jiri, Manoli, Sahana, Lorenc, Michał T., Lai, Kaitao, Batley, Jacqueline, Fleury, Delphine, Šimková, Hana, Kubaláková, Marie, Weining, Song, Doležel, Jaroslav and Edwards, David (2013) Dispersion and domestication shaped the genome of bread wheat. Plant Biotechnology Journal, 11 (5). pp. 564-571. ISSN 1467-7644 (Print), 1467-7652 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/pbi.12044)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Publisher's PDF - Open Access)
17914 VISENDI_Genome_of_Bread_Wheat_2013.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (539kB) | Preview

Abstract

Despite the international significance of wheat, its large and complex genome hinders genome sequencing efforts. To assess the impact of selection on this genome, we have assembled genomic regions representing genes for chromosomes 7A, 7B and 7D. We demonstrate that the dispersion of wheat to new environments has shaped the modern wheat genome. Most genes are conserved between the three homoeologous chromosomes. We found differential gene loss that supports current theories on the evolution of wheat, with greater loss observed in the A and B genomes compared with the D. Analysis of intervarietal polymorphisms identified fewer polymorphisms in the D genome, supporting the hypothesis of early gene flow between the tetraploid and hexaploid. The enrichment for genes on the D genome that confer environmental adaptation may be associated with dispersion following wheat domestication. Our results demonstrate the value of applying next-generation sequencing technologies to assemble gene- rich regions of complex genomes and investigate polyploid genome evolution. We anticipate the genome-wide application of this reduced-complexity syntenic assembly approach will accelerate crop improvement efforts not only in wheat, but also in other polyploid crops of significance.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Triticum aestivum, Genome sequencing, Evolution
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Molecular Virology and Entomology Research Group
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2017 11:53
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/17914

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics