Skip navigation

Behavioural correlates of energy drink consumption among adolescents: A review of the literature

Behavioural correlates of energy drink consumption among adolescents: A review of the literature

Dawodu, Ade and Cleaver, Karen ORCID: 0000-0001-5303-1036 (2017) Behavioural correlates of energy drink consumption among adolescents: A review of the literature. Journal of Child Health Care, 21 (4). pp. 446-462. ISSN 1367-4935 (Print), 1741-2889 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/1367493517731948)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Author Accepted Manuscript)
17689 CLEAVER_Energy_Drink_Consumption_Among_Adolescents_2017 .pdf - Accepted Version

Download (243kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (Table 1)
17689 CLEAVER_Table_1_2017.pdf - Supplemental Material

Download (295kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (Figure 1)
17689 CLEAVER_Figure 1_2017.pdf - Supplemental Material

Download (263kB) | Preview

Abstract

Despite regulatory measures on the labelling of energy drinks (EDs), their consumption among adolescents continues to grow in popularity, but teachers increasingly report significant behavioural concerns among students who disclose habitual ED consumption. A review of papers published between January 2010 and October 2016 was undertaken to determine whether an association between adverse behaviour and consumption of ED exists. Findings indicate that ED consumption among adolescents is associated with alcohol and substance use, risky behaviours and psychological states including sensation seeking, depression and anxiety symptoms. ED consumption impacts negatively on executive functions and increases hyperactivity/inattention symptoms among adolescents. An inverse association between ED consumption and sleep duration exists. The findings highlight the need for greater awareness of the potential risk of ED consumption among adolescents.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Adolescents, Energy drinks, Risky behaviours, Young people
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Department of Family Care & Mental Health
Faculty of Education & Health > Health & Society Research Group
Last Modified: 17 May 2019 17:20
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 5
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/17689

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics