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The need to implement the landscape of fear within rodent pest management strategies

The need to implement the landscape of fear within rodent pest management strategies

Krijger, Inge M., Belmain, Steven R. ORCID: 0000-0002-5590-7545, Singleton, Grant R., Groot Koerkamp, Peter W. G. and Meerburg, Bastiaan G. (2017) The need to implement the landscape of fear within rodent pest management strategies. Pest Management Science, 73 (12). pp. 2397-2402. ISSN 1526-498X (Print), 1526-4998 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/ps.4626)

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Abstract

Current reactive pest management methods have serious drawbacks such as the heavy reliance on chemicals, emerging genetic rodenticide resistance, and high secondary exposure risks. Rodent control needs to be based on pest-species ecology and ethology to facilitate development of ecologically-based rodent management (EBRM). An important aspect of EBRM is a strong understanding of rodent pest species ecology, behaviour, and spatiotemporal factors. Gaining insight in the behaviour of pest-species is a key aspect of EBRM. The landscape of fear is a mapping of the spatial variation in the foraging cost arising from the risk of predation and reflects levels of fear a prey species perceives at different locations within its home range. In practice, the landscape of fear (LOF) is a mapping of habitat use as a result of perceived fear, which shows where bait or traps are most likely to be encountered and used by rodents. Several studies link perceived predation risk of foraging animals with quitting-harvest rates or giving-up densities (GUDs). GUDs have been used to reflect foraging behaviour strategies of predator avoidance, but to our knowledge very few papers have directly used GUDs in relation to pest management strategies. An opportunity for rodent control strategies lies in the integration of the LOF of rodents in EBRM methodologies. Rodent management could be more efficient and effective by concentrating on those areas where rodents perceive the least levels of predation risk.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Rodent ecology; Ecologically-based rodent management; GUD; IPM; Predation risk; Rodent control; Landscape of fear
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Pest Behaviour Research Group
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2017 12:39
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/17367

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