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Extending the design of games for e-Learning to include affective computing elements

Extending the design of games for e-Learning to include affective computing elements

Hallan Graven, Olaf, MacKinnon, Lachlan and Bacon, Liz (2014) Extending the design of games for e-Learning to include affective computing elements. In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on e-Learning (ICEL 2014). ACPIL (Academic Conferences and Publishing International Ltd.), Reading, UK, pp. 59-66. ISBN 978-1-909507-69-2 ISSN 2048-8882 (Print), 2048-8890 (Online)

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Abstract

The use of human emotion in learning situations has been a feature of learning and training since earliest times, since it has been seen to speed and personalise the process. Research in affective computing has focused on providing realistic and appropriate representations of human emotions on computers, and using these to create more realistic emotional interactions between humans and computers. A strong driver in this activity has been the games industry, seeking to make games more realistic and engaging. The authors have been involved for some time in research on the use of games for eLearning, and this paper considers the use of affective computing techniques within such games. The benefits are seen as greater engagement and immersion of students, faster achievement of "suspension of disbelief", willingness to reuse and revisit learning materials, and the potential to introduce realistic emotions and stresses into the learning situation. Two similar but contrasting approaches, from the Pandora and Maritime City projects, are also discussed. The conclusion is that affective computing techniques can enhance games for eLearning, but only if skilfully applied and with strong production values, as poor application of affective techniques can render a game unusable and laughable.

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
Title of Proceedings: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on e-Learning (ICEL 2014)
Additional Information: Paper presented at the 9th International Conference on e-Learning, Technical University Federico Santa María, Valparaiso, Chile, 26-27 June 2014.
Uncontrolled Keywords: e-Learning; Games; Affective computing introduction
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities
Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > Department of Computing & Information Systems
Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > eCentre
Last Modified: 10 May 2017 10:51
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/17256

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