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Determining the haemodynamic significance of arterial stenosis: the relationship between CT angiography, computational fluid dynamics, and non-invasive fractional flow reserve

Determining the haemodynamic significance of arterial stenosis: the relationship between CT angiography, computational fluid dynamics, and non-invasive fractional flow reserve

Pang, C.L., Alcock, R., Pilkington, N., Reis, T. ORCID: 0000-0003-2671-416X and Roobottom, C. (2016) Determining the haemodynamic significance of arterial stenosis: the relationship between CT angiography, computational fluid dynamics, and non-invasive fractional flow reserve. Clinical Radiology, 71 (8). pp. 750-757. ISSN 0009-9260 (Print), 1365-229X (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crad.2016.03.001)

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Abstract

Coronary artery disease causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is currently the reference standard investigation. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) complements traditional ICA by providing extra information on blood flow, which has convincingly led to better patient management and improved cost-effectiveness. Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) is suitable for the investigation of chest pain, especially in the low- and intermediate-risk groups. FFR generated using CT data (producing FFRCT) may improve the positive predictive value of CTCA. The basic science of FFRCT is like a “black box” to most imaging professionals. A fundamental principle is that good quality CTCA is likely to make any post-processing easier and more reliable. Both diagnostic and observational studies have suggested that the accuracy and the short-term outcome of using FFRCT are both comparable with FFR in ICA. More multidisciplinary research with further refined diagnostic and longer-term observational studies will hopefully pinpoint the role of FFRCT in existing clinical pathways.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: CT angiography, Computational fluid dynamics
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities
Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > Department of Mathematical Sciences
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2018 09:50
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2018: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/16935

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