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Morality and beliefs in advocacy coalitions and their interaction with policy positions: lessons from stakeholders in England and New South Wales

Morality and beliefs in advocacy coalitions and their interaction with policy positions: lessons from stakeholders in England and New South Wales

Zampini, Giulia Federica ORCID: 0000-0002-9456-4792 (2017) Morality and beliefs in advocacy coalitions and their interaction with policy positions: lessons from stakeholders in England and New South Wales. In: PROSPOL COST action, 29-31 March 2017, Aalborg University Copenhagen. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The regulation of sex work worldwide reflects the moral polarisation around the subject of sex for sale. Within policy-making at all levels, stakeholders battle through ‘emotions, dreams, desires and expectations’ that are often conflicting and incompatible.

Localised, fragmented and haphazard policy responses coexist with the ever increasing and contradictory pressures of neoliberal globalisation, which pushes individuals towards mobility and low-skilled labour whilst also moralising and constricting the type and space of that labour. Contradictions are played out in domestic policy arenas via discourses, policies and strategies, but also in the emotions and expectations of stakeholders.

The presence of morality and ideology and their effects on the issue of sex for sale are acknowledged by scholars in the field; yet they are seldom investigated in any depth. It is often the case that morality is confused with moralism - bestowed upon ‘abolitionist feminists’ who argue in favour of the criminalisation of demand - failing to recognise that all stakeholders have complex moral positions that shape their views. It becomes relevant to ask: in what ways do stakeholders negotiate their policy positions given the polarisation of views and to what extent are these driven by morality and ideology?

To address these questions, I will combine analysis of stakeholders’ interview data and views expressed in the public domain with reflections on the differing moral, affective and ideological bases supporting these views. I will illustrate this negotiation process using an adapted version of the advocacy coalition framework, creating a dialogue between individual experiences, ideological pressures and conflicting moralities. The aim of this paper is to develop the concept of morality as an analytical tool to address both affective and ideological biases that prevent agreement on policy goals and collaboration in this area.

Item Type: Conference or Conference Paper (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Morality; Ideology; Affect; Advocacy coalitions; Policy positions; Policy stakeholders
Subjects: K Law > KD England and Wales
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities
Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > Department of Law
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2019 20:11
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/16679

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