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Combined and relative effect levels of perceived risk, knowledge, optimism, pessimism, and social trust on anxiety among inhabitants concerning living on heavy metal contaminated soil

Combined and relative effect levels of perceived risk, knowledge, optimism, pessimism, and social trust on anxiety among inhabitants concerning living on heavy metal contaminated soil

Tang, Zhongjun, Guo, Zengli, Zhou, Li ORCID: 0000-0001-7132-5935, Xue, Shengguo, Zhu, Qinfeng and Zhu, Huike (2016) Combined and relative effect levels of perceived risk, knowledge, optimism, pessimism, and social trust on anxiety among inhabitants concerning living on heavy metal contaminated soil. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13 (11):1076. pp. 1-17. ISSN 1661-7827 (Print), 1660-4601 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13111076)

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Abstract

This research aims at combined and relative effect levels on anxiety of: (1) perceived risk, knowledge, optimism, pessimism, and social trust; and (2) four sub-variables of social trust among inhabitants concerning living on heavy metal contaminated soil. On the basis of survey data from 499 Chinese respondents, results suggest that perceived risk, pessimism, optimism, and social trust have individual, significant, and direct effects on anxiety, while knowledge does not. Knowledge has significant, combined, and interactive effects on anxiety together with social trust and pessimism, respectively, but does not with perceived risk and optimism. Social trust, perceived risk, pessimism, knowledge, and optimism have significantly combined effects on anxiety; the five variables as a whole have stronger predictive values than each one individually. Anxiety is influenced firstly by social trust and secondly by perceived risk, pessimism, knowledge, and optimism. Each of four sub-variables of social trust has an individual, significant, and negative effect on anxiety. When introducing four sub-variables into one model, trust in social organizations and in the government have significantly combined effects on anxiety, while trust in experts and in friends and relatives do not; anxiety is influenced firstly by trust in social organization, and secondly by trust in the government.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution. SRJ 0.883 (2015)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Anxiety; Contaminated soil; Knowledge; Optimism; Perceived risk; Social trust
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Faculty of Business > Department of Systems Management & Strategy
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2018 15:46
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: GREAT d
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/15928

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