Skip navigation

Societies in transition: are they more sexist? A comparison between Polish, South African and British samples

Societies in transition: are they more sexist? A comparison between Polish, South African and British samples

Zawisza, Magdalena, Luyt, Russell and Zawadzka, Anna Maria (2015) Societies in transition: are they more sexist? A comparison between Polish, South African and British samples. Journal of Gender Studies, 24 (1). pp. 38-55. ISSN 0958-9236 (Print), 1465-3869 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/09589236.2013.803952)

[img]
Preview
PDF (Author's Accepted Manuscript)
15766_Luyt_Society in transition (AAM) 2015.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (289kB) | Preview

Abstract

This study investigates ambivalent sexism to women in student samples from two under-researched transitional countries, Poland (PL) and South Africa (SA), in comparison with the United Kingdom. Based on ambivalent sexism theory (AST), and in light of socio-economic context, it was hypothesised that: (1) the sample in PL and SA would be more hostile- and benevolent-sexist than the sample from the UK, (2) males would exhibit more hostile attitudes than females irrespective of country and (3) males would outscore females on benevolent attitudes in the relatively liberal UK but underscore them in relatively conservative SA. The Ambivalent Sexism Inventory was used to measure benevolent and hostile sexism. The findings largely supported the hypotheses. The participants in SA and PL were more sexist than in the UK and men were more hostile-sexist than women in all three countries. However, males outscored females on benevolent sexism not only in the UK but also in SA and PL. Moreover, the sample from PL was observed to be more sexist than the sample from SA. The findings are discussed in light of AST and the countries’ transitional context.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Gender Studies on June 3rd, 2013, available online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09589236.2013.803952
Uncontrolled Keywords: Ambivalent sexism; gender attitudes; transition to democracy; Poland; South Africa; United Kingdom
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2017 09:43
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: GREAT b
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/15766

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics