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Identification and characterization of more than 4 million intervarietal SNPs across the group 7 chromosomes of bread wheat

Identification and characterization of more than 4 million intervarietal SNPs across the group 7 chromosomes of bread wheat

Lai, Kaitao, Lorenc, Michał T., Lee, Hong Ching, Berkman, Paul J., Bayer, Philipp Emanuel, Visendi, Paul, Ruperao, Pradeep, Fitzgerald, Timothy L., Zander, Manuel, Chan, Chon-Kit Kenneth, Manoli, Sahana, Stiller, Jiri, Batley, Jacqueline and Edwards, David (2015) Identification and characterization of more than 4 million intervarietal SNPs across the group 7 chromosomes of bread wheat. Plant Biotechnology Journal, 13 (1). pp. 97-104. ISSN 1467-7644 (Print), 1467-7652 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/pbi.12240)

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Abstract

Despite being a major international crop, our understanding of the wheat genome is relatively poor due to its large size and complexity. To gain a greater understanding of wheat genome diversity, we have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms between 16 Australian bread wheat varieties. Whole-genome shotgun Illumina paired read sequence data were mapped to the draft assemblies of chromosomes 7A, 7B and 7D to identify more than 4 million intervarietal SNPs. SNP density varied between the three genomes, with much greater density observed on the A and B genomes than the D genome. This variation may be a result of substantial gene flow from the tetraploid Triticum turgidum, which possesses A and B genomes, during early co-cultivation of tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. In addition, we examined SNP density variation along the chromosome syntenic builds and identified genes in low-density regions which may have been selected during domestication and breeding. This study highlights the impact of evolution and breeding on the bread wheat genome and provides a substantial resource for trait association and crop improvement. All SNP data are publically available on a generic genome browser GBrowse at www.wheatgenome.info.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Triticum aestivum, diversity, single nucleotide polymorphisms, evolution.
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Last Modified: 07 Oct 2016 15:15
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/14765

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