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A crop of one's own? Women’s experiences of cassava commercialization in Nigeria and Malawi

A crop of one's own? Women’s experiences of cassava commercialization in Nigeria and Malawi

Forsythe, Lora ORCID: 0000-0001-9931-4453, Posthumus, Helena and Martin, Adrienne ORCID: 0000-0001-9305-7302 (2016) A crop of one's own? Women’s experiences of cassava commercialization in Nigeria and Malawi. Journal of Gender, Agriculture and Food Security, 1 (2):2. pp. 110-128. ISSN 2413-922X (Online)

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Abstract

Improving the effectiveness of agricultural markets for economic growth and poverty reduction has been a central focus for development initiatives, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Staple crops with low input requirements and drought tolerance, such as cassava, are being promoted for market development due to their accessibility for poor smallholder farmers. Narratives often equate commercialization of cassava to benefits for women, as cassava is commonly labelled a ‘women’s crop’. However, little is known about whether or how women can engage with new cassava commercial opportunities and the livelihood outcomes from this, particularly given the importance of cassava for food security. Findings from fieldwork in Nigeria and Malawi identify cassava value chains that offer different opportunities and challenges for women, which are often overlooked in agricultural development narratives. Women can gainfully participate in new commercial cassava opportunities while maintaining, if not increasing, food security. However, this is highly dependent on gender norms and household relations. Greater attention is required to these more difficult aspects of gender analysis in development projects to ensure women’s integration and benefit from agricultural markets

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cassava, Women, Gender, Markets, Food security, Norms
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Livelihoods & Institutions Department
Last Modified: 16 May 2019 12:15
Selected for GREAT 2016: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 1
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/14707

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