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Nor-hopanes from Zanha africana root bark with toxicity to bruchid beetles

Nor-hopanes from Zanha africana root bark with toxicity to bruchid beetles

Stevenson, Philip C ORCID: 0000-0002-0736-3619, Green, Paul WC, Veitch, Nigel C, Farrell, Iain W, Kusolwa, Paul and Belmain, Steven ORCID: 0000-0002-5590-7545 (2016) Nor-hopanes from Zanha africana root bark with toxicity to bruchid beetles. Phytochemistry, 123. pp. 25-32. ISSN 0031-9422 (Print), 1873-3700 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phytochem.2016.01.008)

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Abstract

Zanha africana (Radlk.) Exell (Sapindaceae) root bark is used by farmers throughout sub-Saharan Africa to protect stored grain from bruchid beetles, such as Callosobruchus maculatus. Chloroform, methanol and water extracts of Z. africana root bark inhibited oviposition and caused significantly higher mortality of C. maculatus at a rate of application equivalent to that applied by farmers compared to control insects. The chloroform extract contained nor-hopanes rarely found in plants of which seven were isolated, one of which was previously known. Two of the most abundant nor-hopanes 3β,6β-dihydroxy-7β-[(4-hydroxybenzoyl)oxy]-21αH-24-norhopa-4(23),22(29)-diene and 3β,6β-dihydroxy-7β-[(4-hydroxybenzoyl)oxy]-24-norhopa-4(23),17(21)-diene were toxic to and reduced oviposition of C. maculatus in a dose dependent manner. Z. africana root bark is rich in insecticidal compounds that account for its effective use by smallholder farmers as an alternative to conventional insecticides.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2016. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords: Zanha africana, Sapindaceae, cowpea; Fabaceae; bruchid beetles; Callosobruchus maculatus; pesticidal plants, botanicals, stored product pests, post-harvest pest management, Vigna unguiculata
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Agriculture, Health & Environment Department
Faculty of Engineering & Science > Natural Resources Institute > Chemical Ecology Research Group
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2018 13:52
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: GREAT d
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/14275

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