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The effects of performing isometric training at two exercise intensities in healthy young males

The effects of performing isometric training at two exercise intensities in healthy young males

Wiles, Jonathan Derek, Coleman, Damian A. and Swaine, Ian L. (2009) The effects of performing isometric training at two exercise intensities in healthy young males. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 108 (3). pp. 419-428. ISSN 1439-6319 (Print), 1439-6327 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-009-1025-6)

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Abstract

No previous studies have examined the effects of isometric training intensity upon resting blood pressure (BP). The aims of this study were (a) to compare the effects of leg isometric training, performed at two intensities, upon resting systolic-SBP, diastolic-DBP and mean arterial-MAP BP; and (b) to examine selected cardiovascular variables, in an attempt to explain any changes in resting BP following training. Thirty-three participants were randomly allocated to either control, high- (HI) or low-intensity (LI) training for 8 weeks. Participants performed 4 × 2 min exercise bouts 3× weekly. Resting BP was measured at baseline, 4-weeks and post-training. SBP, DBP and MAP fell significantly in both groups after training. Changes were -5.2 ± 4.0, -2.6 ± 2.9 and -2.5 ± 2.2 mmHg [HI]; -3.7 ± 3.7, -2.5 ± 4.8 and -2.6 ± 2.5 mmHg [LI] for SBP, DBP and MAP, respectively. There were no significant changes in BP at 4 weeks. No significant changes were observed in any of the other cardiovascular variables examined. These findings suggest that isometric training causes reductions in SBP, DBP and MAP at a range of exercise intensities, when it is performed over 8 weeks. Furthermore, it is possible to reduce resting BP using a much lower isometric exercise intensity than has previously been shown. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate variability, total peripheral resistance
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure
Q Science > QP Physiology
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:34
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/13679

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