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Predicting infiltration and pollutant retention in sustainable drainage systems: Experiments, modelling and design

Predicting infiltration and pollutant retention in sustainable drainage systems: Experiments, modelling and design

Quinn, Ruth and Dussaillant, Alejandro (2014) Predicting infiltration and pollutant retention in sustainable drainage systems: Experiments, modelling and design. In: 12th British Hydrological Society National Symposium, 2-4 September 2014, Birmingham, UK.

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Abstract

A major problem of increasing urbanization is the rise in pollution caused by runoff, affecting water quality directly and due to combined sewer overflows. Among alternative strategies, Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) such as rain gardens and other bioretention facilities is becoming more widespread. Previous research has focused primarily on hydrologic design, including the degree to which groundwater is replenished by these systems, and models have been developed to quantify the extent of that enhanced focused recharge. However, there are few tools for their design that adequately consider pollutant retention. We have developed a numerical model that simulates infiltration into different area systems with porous media of up to three layers, and can simulate movement and accumulation of metals considering macropore flow. This model is here further validated using new laboratory column results (for matrix and macropore flow), and applied to the design of a rain garden system for a planned roundabout in Kent, U.K, considering climate change scenarios. Results using past and potential future climate series show levels of lead can build up in the upper layers of the system, but only constitute a health hazard after approximately 10 years (when a management intervention such as replacing the upper few cm of soil is required). Implications and future opportunities are discussed.

Item Type: Conference or Conference Paper (Poster)
Additional Information: [1] Acknowledgements (funding): This work was funded by the University of Greenwich RAE-11 grant and School of Engineering funding for Ph.D. studentship and laboratory studies. [2] Acknowledgements: We would also like to thank technicians from the Department of Civil Engineering for their critical help, Bronwyn Buntine, SuDS Manager from Kent County Council, and colleagues Roger Smith and John Norman for their always generous support.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Sustainable drainage, Rain garden, Kinematic wave, Macropore flow, Climate change, Layered soil
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Engineering Science
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2016 13:17
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/13558

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