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Motivations in Battlefield Tourism: the case of ‘1916 Easter Rising Rebellion', Dublin

Motivations in Battlefield Tourism: the case of ‘1916 Easter Rising Rebellion', Dublin

Kokkranikal, Jithendran ORCID: 0000-0003-0103-562X, Sun Yang, Yeon, Powell, Raymond and Booth, Elizabeth (2016) Motivations in Battlefield Tourism: the case of ‘1916 Easter Rising Rebellion', Dublin. In: Springer Proceedings in Business and Economics Tourism and Culture in the Age of Innovation. Tourism and Culture in the Age of Innovation . Springer International Publishing Switzerland, Switzerland, pp. 321-331. ISBN 9783319275277 ISSN 2198-7246 (Print), 2198-7254 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27528-4)

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Abstract

Journeys to battlefields or war-related sites are categorised as dark tourism. Dark tourism is travelling to sites associated with death, disasters or atrocities and has emerged as a major tourist attraction (Sharpley, 2009; Lennon and Foley, 2000). As it deals with a wide range of travel related to death and disaster, definitions and descriptions of dark tourism have been eclectic and fuzzy (Sharpley and Stone, 2009). It involves visiting concentration camps, war memorials, cemeteries, scenes of mass murder, horror museums, fields of fatality, sites of natural disasters and perilous places (Dann, 1998, Sharpley, 2005), and has been varyingly described as ‘morbid tourism’ (Blom, 2000), ‘milking the macabre’ (Dann, 1998), thanatourism (Seaton, 1999) ‘black spots tourism’ or ‘sensation sights tourism’ (Rojek, 1993; Rojek, 1997) and ‘the heritage of atrocity tourism’ (Tunbridge and Ashworth, 1996).

Battlefield tourism can be defined as travelling to war-related sites to remember and commemorate the fallen focusing on spiritual and emotional experience (Baldwin and Sharpley, 2009). The battlefields and other artefacts associated with warfare have been drawing visitors for many centuries (Kang, et. al., 2012). A trip to war-related sites could take many different forms, and visitor backgrounds, attitudes and their reasons for visiting war-related sites could also vary.

This paper reports findings of a study examining motivations of visitors to major battlefield destinations related to the ‘1916 Easter Rising Rebellion’. This study employed quantitative research methods with a questionnaire survey at two different sites and a tour associated with Easter Rising rebellion in Dublin, Ireland.

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
Title of Proceedings: Springer Proceedings in Business and Economics Tourism and Culture in the Age of Innovation
Additional Information: 2nd International Conference on Cultural and Digital tourism, Athens, Greece, 21-24 May 2015. The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27528-4
Uncontrolled Keywords: Battlefield Tourism, Dark Tourism, Dublin, Pilgrimage, Easter Rising
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Business
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 12 Apr 2019 14:21
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/13381

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