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Breast cancer screening in women with mental illness: comparative meta-analysis of mammography uptake

Breast cancer screening in women with mental illness: comparative meta-analysis of mammography uptake

Mitchell, Alex J., Pereira, Isabel Espirito Santo, Yadegarfar, Motahare, Pepereke, Shingai, Mugadza, Vongai and Stubbs, Brendon (2014) Breast cancer screening in women with mental illness: comparative meta-analysis of mammography uptake. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 205 (6). pp. 428-435. ISSN 0007-1250 (Print), 1472-1465 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.114.147629)

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Abstract

Background: There is a higher mortality rate due to cancer in people with mental illness and previous work suggests suboptimal medical care in this population. It remains unclear if this extends to breast cancer population screening.

Aims: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish if women with a mental health condition are less likely to receive mammography screening compared with those without mental ill health.

Method: Major electronic databases were searched from inception until February 2014. We calculated odds ratios (OR) with a random effects meta-analysis comparing mammography screening rates among women with and without a mental illness. Results were stratified according to primary diagnosis including any mental illness, mood disorders, depression, severe mental illness (SMI), distress and anxiety.

Results: We identified 24 publications reporting breast cancer screening practices in women with mental illness (n = 715 705). An additional 5 studies investigating screening for those with distress (n = 21 491) but no diagnosis of mental disorder were identified. The pooled meta-analysis showed significantly reduced rates of mammography screening in women with mental illness (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.66-0.77), mood disorders (OR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.76-0.90) and particularly SMI (OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.45-0.65). No disparity was evident among women with distress alone.

Conclusions: Rates of mammography screening are lower in women with mental illness, particularly women with SMI, and this is not explained by the presence of emotional distress. Disparities in medical care due to mental illness clearly extend into preventive population screening.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: breast cancer screening, women with mental illness, mammography uptake
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:30
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/12727

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