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The effects of cadence and power output upon physiological and biomechanical responses to incremental arm-crank ergometry.

The effects of cadence and power output upon physiological and biomechanical responses to incremental arm-crank ergometry.

Price, Michael J, Collins, Lee, Smith, Paul M. and Goss-Sampson, Mark (2007) The effects of cadence and power output upon physiological and biomechanical responses to incremental arm-crank ergometry. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 32 (4). pp. 686-92. ISSN 1715-5312 (Print), 1715-5320 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1139/H07-052)

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cadence and power output on physiological and biomechanical responses to incremental arm-crank ergometry (ACE). Ten male subjects (mean +/- SD age, 30.4 +/-5.4 y; height, 1.78 +/-0.07 m; mass, 86.1 +/-14.2 kg) undertook 3 incremental ACE protocols to determine peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak; mean of 3 tests: 3.07 +/- 0.17 L.min-1) at randomly assigned cadences of 50, 70, or 90 r.min-1. Heart rate and expired air were continually monitored. Central (RPE-C) and local (RPE-L) ratings of perceived exertion were recorded at volitional exhaustion. Joint angles and trunk rotation were analysed during each exercise stage. During submaximal power outputs of 50, 70, and 90 W, oxygen consumption (VO2) was lowest for 50 r.min-1 and highest for 90 r.min-1 (p < 0.01). VO2 peak was lowest during 50 r.min-1 (2.79 +/-0.45 L.min-1; p < 0.05) when compared with both 70 r.min-1 and 90 r.min-1 (3.16 +/-0.58, 3.24 +/-0.49 L.min-1, respectively; p > 0.05). The difference between RPE-L and RPE-C at volitional exhaustion was greatest during 50 r.min-1 (2.9 +/- 1.6) when compared with 90 r.min-1 (0.9 +/- 1.9, p < 0.05). At VO2 peak, shoulder range of motion (ROM) and trunk rotation were greater for 50 and 70 r.min-1 when compared with 90 r.min-1 (p < 0.05). During submaximal power outputs, shoulder angle and trunk rotation were greatest at 50 r.min-1 when compared with 90 r.min-1 (p < 0.05). VO2 was inversely related to both trunk rotation and shoulder ROM during submaximal power outputs. The results of this study suggest that the greater forces required at lower cadences to produce a given power output resulted in greater joint angles and range of shoulder and trunk movement. Greater isometric contractions for torso stabilization and increased cost of breathing possibly from respiratory-locomotor coupling may have contributed increased oxygen consumption at higher cadences.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Arm crank ergometry
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Engineering & Science > Department of Life & Sports Sciences
Last Modified: 05 Dec 2016 16:25
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/12424

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