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The pattern of occupational accidents, injuries, accident causal factors and intervention in Nigerian factories

The pattern of occupational accidents, injuries, accident causal factors and intervention in Nigerian factories

Umeokafor, Nnedinma, Evaggelinos, Kostis, Lundy, Shaun, Isaac, David, Allan, Stuart, Igwegbe, Ogechukwu, Umeokafor, Kosi and Umeadi, Boniface (2014) The pattern of occupational accidents, injuries, accident causal factors and intervention in Nigerian factories. Developing Country Studies, 4 (15). pp. 119-127. ISSN 2224-607X (Print), 2225-0565 (Online)

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Abstract

Understanding the status quo of occupational incidents in Nigeria in relation to accident rates, fatality rates, accident causal factors and intervention is vital in developing effective strategies for improving the problematic state of occupational health and safety (OHS) in Nigeria. As such, this study explores the pattern of reported accidents, injuries, near misses, accident causal factors and intervention in Nigeria. It reviews and discusses accidents reported to the custodian of OHS in Nigeria, the Federal Ministry of Labour and Productivity Inspectorate Division (FMLPID) over an 11-year period (2002-2012). Analysis of the data collected was also conducted, the findings from which prompted interviews of 10 staff out of 48 staff employed by FMLPID. Over the 11 year period, this study found that of the reported accidents: 80% occurred at night; manufacturers of rubber products accounted for the highest number of injuries at 53.8% and 63% for death; the total case fatality rate was 49.5, hence a significant increase in case fatality rate compared with the last study in 2001 by Ezenwa. Fire resulted in 53% of the deaths, while management factors accounted for 91.3% of the remote or contributory accident causal factors in which 90% were due to lack of training. Also, with a notable reduction in accident reporting in Nigeria and the FMLPID reportedly failing to penalise offenders as specified by the OHS legislation as established in this study, an overhaul of the operations of the FMLPID is therefore recommended. This is in addition with development and adoption of free mobile accident reporting system for victims.
Keywords: Accidents, accident causal factors, fatality, injuries, intervention and Nigeria.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] The journal is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) License.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Accidents; Accident causal factors; Fatality; Injuries; Intervention and Nigeria
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
T Technology > TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General)
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities
Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > Department of Built Environment
Faculty of Architecture, Computing & Humanities > Sustainable Built Environment Research Group (SBERG)
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 25 Nov 2016 16:03
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/12354

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