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The functional exercise capacity and its correlates in obese treatment-seeking people with binge eating disorder: an exploratory study

The functional exercise capacity and its correlates in obese treatment-seeking people with binge eating disorder: an exploratory study

Vancampfort, Davy, De Herdt, Amber, Vanderlinden, Johan, Lannoo, Matthias, Adriaens, An, De Hert, Marc, Stubbs, Brendon, Soundy, Andrew and Probst, Michel (2015) The functional exercise capacity and its correlates in obese treatment-seeking people with binge eating disorder: an exploratory study. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37 (9). pp. 777-782. ISSN 0963-8288 (Print), 1464-5165 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2014.942000)

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Abstract

Purpose: The primary aim was to compare the functional exercise capacity between obese treatment-seeking people with and without binge eating disorder (BED) and non-obese controls. The secondary aim was to identify clinical variables including eating and physical activity behaviour, physical complaints, psychopathology and physical self-perception variables in obese people with BED that could explain the variability in functional exercise capacity.

Methods: Forty people with BED were compared with 20 age-, gender- and body mass index (BMI)-matched obese persons without BED and 40 age and gender matched non-obese volunteers. A 6-minute walk test (6MWT), the Baecke physical activity questionnaire, the Symptom Checklist-90, the Physical Self-Perception Profile and the Eating Disorder Inventory were administered. Physical complaints before and after the 6MWT were also documented.

Results: The distance achieved on the 6MWT was significantly lower in obese participants with BED (512.1 ± 75.8 m versus 682.7 ± 98.4, p < 0.05) compared to non-obese controls. No significant differences were found between obese participants with and without BED. Participants with BED reported significantly (p < 0.05) more musculoskeletal pain and fatigue after the walk test than obese and non-obese controls. A forward stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that sports participation and perceived physical strength explained 41.7% of the variance on the 6MWT in obese participants with BED.

Conclusion: Physical activity participation, physical self-perception and perceived physical discomfort during walking should be considered when developing rehabilitation programs for obese people with BED.

Implications for Rehabilitation:

• Rehabilitation programmes in people with binge eating disorder should incorporate a functional exercise capacity assessment.

• Clinicians involved in the rehabilitation of people with binge eating disorder should consider depression and lower self-esteem as potential barriers.

• Clinicians should take into account the frequently observed physical discomfort when developing rehabilitation programmes for people with binge eating disorder.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: binge eating, obesity, physical activity, self-concept, walking
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2016 10:33
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/11984

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