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Pain interference is associated with psychological concerns related to falls in community-dwelling older adults: a multisite observational study

Pain interference is associated with psychological concerns related to falls in community-dwelling older adults: a multisite observational study

Stubbs, Brendon, Eggermont, Laura H. P., Patchay, Sandhi ORCID: 0000-0002-7013-8940 and Schofield, Pat A. (2014) Pain interference is associated with psychological concerns related to falls in community-dwelling older adults: a multisite observational study. Physical Therapy, 94 (10). pp. 1410-1420. ISSN 0031-9023 (Print), 1538-6724 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.2522/ptj.20140093)

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Abstract

Background: Pain interference and psychological concerns related to falls (PCRF) are pervasive phenomena among community dwelling older adults, yet their association remains elusive.

Objective: To establish if pain interference is associated with psychological concerns related to falls in community dwelling older adults.

Design: Multisite cross sectional study.

Method: Two hundred and ninety five community dwelling older adults were recruited (77.5±8.1 years, 66.4% female). All participants completed the brief pain inventory (BPI) interference subscale and the short falls efficacy scale international (FES-I), activities balance confidence scale (ABC), the modified version of the survey of activities and fear of falling in elderly scale (mSAFFE) and consequences of falling scale (CoF). Hierarchical multiple regression analysis were conducted. In the first step socio-demographic and known risk factors for PCRF were inserted into the model, followed by the BPI interference subscale score in the second step.

Results: One hundred and sixty nine (57.3%) participants reported some pain interference. The BPI interference subscale was highly correlated with all PCRF (r>0.5, p<0.0001). After the adjustment for established risk factors, the BPI interference subscale significantly increased the variance in the short FES-I scale (R2 change=13.2%), the ABC (R2 change=4.7%), mSAFFE (R2 change =5.0%) and CoF (R2 change =10.0%). Pain interference was a significant and independent predictor in the final model for the short FES-1 (β=.455, p<0.001), ABC (β=-.265, p<0.001), mSAFFE (β=.276, p<0.001) and CoF scale (β=.390, p<0.001).

Limitations: This study was cross sectional.

Conclusions: Pain interference is an important contributing factor to each of the psychological concerns related to falls. Pain interference had the strongest impact on reducing falls efficacy and increasing older adults concerns about the consequences of falling.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: [1] Physical Therapy (PTJ) is the official scientific journal of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF).
Uncontrolled Keywords: pain interference, psychological concerns related to falls, (PCRF), community dwelling older adults
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RS Pharmacy and materia medica
Faculty / Department / Research Group: Faculty of Education & Health
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 20 May 2019 02:34
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: GREAT a
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: GREAT 3
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/11606

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