Skip navigation

How long did it last? A 10-year reconviction follow-up study of high intensity training for young offenders

How long did it last? A 10-year reconviction follow-up study of high intensity training for young offenders

Jolliffe, Darrick ORCID: 0000-0003-4590-6343, Farrington, David P. and Howard, Philip (2013) How long did it last? A 10-year reconviction follow-up study of high intensity training for young offenders. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 9 (4). pp. 515-531. ISSN 1573-3750 (Print), 1572-8315 (Online) (doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11292-013-9191-2)

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Objectives: Most research has suggested that correctional boot camps are not very successful in reducing reoffending, but recent evidence has been more encouraging for programs that include significant rehabilitative components. In line with this, High Intensity Training (HIT) for offenders aged 18–21 at Thorn Cross Young Offender Institution in England was followed by a significant reduction in the number of reconvictions in a 2-year follow up. This article aims to evaluate the impact of the HIT program after 10 years.

Methods: The evaluation used a quasi-experimental design in which male young offenders who received HIT were individually matched, on their risk of reconviction, to a comparison group who went to other prisons. Official reconviction data, including the prevalence, frequency, types, and costs of offenses were used as the outcome measures.

Results: Offenders who received HIT had a significantly lower prevalence and frequency of reconvictions, but their superiority over the control group reduced over time (after about 4 years). However, the cumulative number of convictions that were saved increased steadily over time, from 1.35 per offender at 2 years to 3.35 per offender at 10 years. The cumulative cost savings also increased over time, and the benefit:cost ratio, based on fewer convictions, increased from 1.13 at 2 years to 3.93 at 10 years.

Conclusions: The beneficial effects of the HIT program became more obvious over time. More randomized experiments and long-term follow-up research, including regular interviews, are needed to evaluate the cumulative and persisting effects of correctional interventions more accurately.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: boot camps, long-term follow-up, reconviction, evaluation, cost–benefit analysis
Subjects: K Law > KD England and Wales
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Humanities & Social Sciences
School of Humanities & Social Sciences > Department of Law & Criminology
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2019 13:44
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
Selected for GREAT 2019: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/10316

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item