Skip navigation

Examining the effect of exit separation on aircraft evacuation performance using evacuation modelling techniques: "Is the 60 foot rule relevant?"

Examining the effect of exit separation on aircraft evacuation performance using evacuation modelling techniques: "Is the 60 foot rule relevant?"

Blake, S., Galea, E.R., Gwynne, S., Lawrence, P. and Filippidis, L. (2001) Examining the effect of exit separation on aircraft evacuation performance using evacuation modelling techniques: "Is the 60 foot rule relevant?". CMS Press, Greenwich, London, UK. ISBN 1899991727

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

This paper examines the influence of exit separation, exit availability and seating configuration on aircraft evacuation efficiency and evacuation time. The purpose of this analysis is to explore how these parameters influence the 60 foot exit separation requirement found in aircraft certification rules. The analysis makes use of the airEXODUS evacuation model and is based on a typical wide-body aircraft cabin section involving two pairs of Type-A exits located at either end of the section with a maximum permissible loading of 220 passengers located between the exits. The analysis reveals that there is a complex relationship between exit separation and evacuation efficiency. Indeed, other factors such as exit flow rate and exit availability are shown to exert a strong influence on critical exit separations. A main finding of this work is that for the cabin section examined under certification conditions, exit separations up to 170 feet will result in approximately constant total evacuation times and average personal evacuation times. This practical exit separation threshold is decreased to 114 feet if another combination of exits is selected. While other factors must also be considered when determining maximum allowable exit separations, these results suggest it is not possible to mandate a maximum exit separation without taking into consideration exit type, exit availability and aircraft configuration. This has implications when determining maximum allowable exit separations for wide and narrow body aircraft. It is also relevant when considering the maximum allowable separation between different exit types on a given aircraft configuration.

Item Type: Book
Additional Information: [1] CMS Press No: 01/IM/71.
Uncontrolled Keywords: accident prevention, aircraft escape devices, deck landing aircraft, laws and legislation, performance, registration of engineers, regulatory compliance, standards, structural design, wings, aircraft design, aircraft evacuation, passenger loads, safety standards, aircraft emergency exits
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA76 Computer software
T Technology > TL Motor vehicles. Aeronautics. Astronautics
Pre-2014 Departments: School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Centre for Numerical Modelling & Process Analysis
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Centre for Numerical Modelling & Process Analysis > Fire Safety Engineering Group
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Department of Computer Science
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences > Department of Mathematical Sciences
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 09:01
Selected for GREAT 2016: None
Selected for GREAT 2017: None
Selected for GREAT 2018: None
URI: http://gala.gre.ac.uk/id/eprint/716

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item